Col. Bhupender Bishnoi, Lt. Col. K. Gurannavar and Major G. S. Bali from Remount Veterinary Corps are undergoing training on the principles and practices in imaging and endoscopy in equines and canines.

The Indian Army has sent three of its veterinarians to the Madras Veterinary College in Vepery to gain knowledge on modern equipment and technology used for treating small animals.

Col. Bhupender Bishnoi, Lt. Col. K. Gurannavar and Major G. S. Bali from the Remount Veterinary Corps (RVC) are undergoing three weeks’ training on the principles and practices in imaging and endoscopy in equines and canines.

“We have signed a memorandum of understanding with the Indian Army to train its veterinarians every year depending on their requirements,” said T. V. Sathiyamurthy, Director of Clinics, Tamil Nadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University (TANUVAS).

The RVC, responsible for breeding, procurement, rearing, training and issue of trained Army horses, mules and dogs. Its activities include disease diagnosis, investigation and research in emerging diseases & treatment of sick animals. It has chosen Madras Veterinary College since it is one of the leading institutions in the country in treating small animals. The college is equipped with the state-of-the-art equipment, including a CT scan for diagnostic and treatment protocols. The college is likely to get an MRI scan.

“The training includes regular classes, theory, practices and hands on training on handling equipment. We will issue certificates at the end of the training programme,” Mr. Sathiyamurthy explained.

The Indian Army has included indigenous dog breeds such as Mudhol hound from Karnataka and Rajapalayam and Chippiparai from Tamil Nadu following a suggestion from Prime Minister Narendra Modi that they are suited best for the Indian conditions. The three Army veterinarians get a chance to observe the treatments offered to native breeds.

“Our training programmes are tailor-made and we design syllabus depending on demand and requirement. As our veterinarians regularly treat beach horses and horses from the Police Department, they have also gained considerable experience. We also have an operation theatre for horses,” said A. Arun Prasad, Resident Veterinar Officer (RVO).

He said the college had adopted modern technology in a big way and had expertise in treating animals big and small.